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Country analysis

Philippines


A long-standing conflict in the south and various recurrent natural disasters drive the humanitarian situation in the Philippines. The main impacts of these crises are displacement and the disruption of services and livelihoods. People living in poverty are particularly vulnerable to these impacts.

Protracted armed conflict in the Mindanao group of islands (in southern Philippines) since the 1960s has resulted in a crisis that requires political, humanitarian, and long-term response. As at 12 January 2024, there were over 145,000 people displaced in the region because of armed conflict, clan feuds, crime, and natural hazards.

The Philippines is also among the most disaster-prone countries in the world. Typhoons, earthquakes, and volcanic eruptions often result in high displacement rates. National authorities, with the support of international partners, largely lead preparedness and response efforts to reoccurring natural disasters and conflict-related displacement. Social cohesion is a significant factor in local resiliency, as the displaced often stay with relatives and friends.

(Global Initiative 10/02/2020, OCHA 15/01/2024, World Bank accessed 26/01/2023)

A long-standing conflict in the south and various recurrent natural disasters drive the humanitarian situation in the Philippines. The main impacts of these crises are displacement and the disruption of services and livelihoods. People living in poverty are particularly vulnerable to these impacts.

Protracted armed conflict in the Mindanao group of islands (in southern Philippines) since the 1960s has resulted in a crisis that requires political, humanitarian, and long-term response. As at 12 January 2024, there were over 145,000 people displaced in the region because of armed conflict, clan feuds, crime, and natural hazards.

The Philippines is also among the most disaster-prone countries in the world. Typhoons, earthquakes, and volcanic eruptions often result in high displacement rates. National authorities, with the support of international partners, largely lead preparedness and response efforts to reoccurring natural disasters and conflict-related displacement. Social cohesion is a significant factor in local resiliency, as the displaced often stay with relatives and friends.

(Global Initiative 10/02/2020, OCHA 15/01/2024, World Bank accessed 26/01/2023)

Latest updates on country situation

19 February 2024

Heavy rains between late January and early February 2024 caused floods and landslides in the Mindanao Islands, mostly affecting Davao and Caraga regions. As at 16 February, around 106,000 people remained displaced, although the number is decreasing as people are returning home. National and international response and assessments continue.


(DROMIC 16/02/2024, Inquirer 07/02/2024, OCHA 14/02/2024)

31 July 2023

Typhoon Doksuri made landfall in northern Philippines on 26 July 2023 at the same time that the southwest monsoon is affecting the country. As at 31 July, Typhoon Doksuri and the southwest monsoon had affected more than 2.6 million people across 13 of the 17 regions of the country and internally displaced more than 254,000. Around 48,000 of the displaced have moved to evacuation centres, while around 206,000 are temporarily staying with their relatives or friends. 70% of the total displaced are in Region III (Central Luzon). The flooding has destroyed nearly 1,700 houses and damaged nearly 45,000. Immediate needs of the affected include food, clean water, relief items such as jerrycans, kitchen kits, and hygiene kits, and shelter and shelter repair. (DSWD 31/07/2023, The Inquirer 01/08/2023, ECHO 29/07/2023)

11 May 2023

More than 25,000 people remain displaced as a result of conflict since 28 March 2023 resulting from a longstanding clan feud between commanders of the Moro Islamic Liberation Front in Datu Saudi Ampatuan town in Maguindanao province, Bangsamoro Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao. Local government authorities are providing assistance to the displaced. Additional food assistance, potable drinking water, hygiene supplies, and sanitation facilities are needed. (OCHA 11/05/2023)

current crises
in Philippines


These crises have been identified through the INFORM Severity Index, a tool for measuring and comparing the severity of humanitarian crises globally.

Read more about the Index

PHL003 - Mindanao Conflict

Last updated 27/05/2024


Drivers

Conflict
Violence

Crisis level

Country

Severity level

2.2 Medium

Access constraints

1.0

Analysis products
on Philippines

Philippines: floods and landslides in Mindanao Island

16 February 2024

Philippines: floods and landslides in Mindanao Island

DOCUMENT / PDF / 985 KB

In late January 2024, torrential rains triggered by the trough of a low-pressure area (LPA) and the northeastern monsoon resulted in widespread floods and landslides across Mindanao Island, southern Philippines. 

Natural hazards
Philippines: Update on Typhoon Rai

31 January 2022

Philippines: Update on Typhoon Rai

DOCUMENT / PDF / 403 KB

This report provides an overview of the impact of the typhoon on Regions 6 (Western Visayas) and 7 (Central Visayas) by province.

Natural hazards
Philippines: Typhoon Rai

19 December 2021

Philippines: Typhoon Rai

DOCUMENT / PDF / 217 KB

On 15 December 2021, tropical depression Twenty-Eight intensified over the western Pacific into typhoon Rai (locally known as Odette). Over 780,000 people were affected by the typhoon and have received some form of support or assistance. 400,000 people require urgent relief and long-term support.

Natural hazards
Philippines: Taal volcano

20 July 2021

Philippines: Taal volcano

DOCUMENT / PDF / 359 KB

On 1 July, a phreatomagmatic eruption was recorded from the main crater of the Taal Volcano, approximately 70km south of central Manila. High levels of volcanic sulfur dioxide emissions and steam-rich plumes were generated from the main crater. The Taal Volcano island is currently considered a danger zone. 

Natural hazards
Philippines: Typhoon Goni

12 November 2020

Philippines: Typhoon Goni

DOCUMENT / PDF / 424 KB

On the morning of 1 November 2020, Typhoon Goni (known locally as Rolly) made landfall in Bicol Region and hit the town of Tiwi in Albay province, causing rivers to overflow and flood much of the region. The typhoon – considered the world’s strongest typhoon so far this year – had maximum sustained winds of 225 km/h and gustiness of up to 280 km/h, moving at 25 km/h. 

Natural hazards
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