• Crisis Severity ?
    3.2
    0 Very low
    Very high 5
  • Impact ?
    3.4
    0 Very low
    Very high 5
  • Humanitarian Conditions ?
    3.4
    0 Very low
    Very high 5
  • Complexity ?
    2.9
    0 Very low
    Very high 5
  • Access Constraints ?
    2.0
    No constraints
    Extreme constraints

Key figures

  • 2,275,000 People affected [?]
  • 1,461,000 People displaced [?]
  • 1,775,000 People in Need [?]

Overview

04/08/2022

Uganda hosts more than 1.5 million refugees and asylum seekers, mostly from South Sudan and the Democratic Republic of Congo. The majority (92%) live in refugee settlements in the Northern and Western regions. A steady influx of refugees into Uganda has continued in 2022, driven by ongoing conflict in South Sudan and the Democratic Republic of Congo. This has overstretched available social services and facilities in refugee settlements. Refugees face high levels of food insecurity, partly due to limited livelihood opportunities available to them.?

A food insecurity crisis has also affected the Karamoja sub-region in northeast Uganda, with around 315,000 projected to face Crisis food insecurity levels (IPC Phase 3) or worse between August 2022 and February 2023.? Karamoja has a poverty rate of 69%, which is well above the national average of 22%. The Karamoja population has also faced several consecutive shocks, including drought (2018–2019), a locust outbreak (2019), floods (2020) and the socio-economic impact of COVID-19 preventive measures (2020-2022). These factors have eroded the refugee population’s coping capacity.?

INFORM measures Uganda's risk of humanitarian crisis and disaster to be high, at 6/10. ?

Latest Developments

16/11/2022

No significant recent humanitarian developments. This crisis is being monitored by our analysis team.

Ebola Outbreak

16/11/2022

On 20 September 2022, the Ugandan health authorities declared an Ebola outbreak after the confirmation of one case in Madudu subcounty (Mubende district). The current outbreak of the Sudan ebolavirus strain is the first to occur in Uganda since 2012.?

As at 12 November, there were 139 confirmed cases and 55 associated deaths. As at 12 November, the affected districts were Bunyangabu, Jinja, Kagadi, Kampala, Kassanda, Kyegegwa, Masaka, Mubende, and Wakiso.?

Among the affected population, there is high reliance on local remedies rather than seeking specialised treatment in health centres. As soon as symptoms develop, many patients choose to visit traditional healers. Many only go to health centres when their symptoms have progressed, with most cases identified and diagnosed after five days of symptoms. This increases the possibility of spreading the virus. There is a high risk that the death toll may increase, with the Government projecting 500 fatalities by April 2023. This is attributable to a combination of factors, including limitations in the effective coordination between Government and humanitarian actors involved in the response, shortages of medical supplies in health centres, and difficulties in managing isolation centres.?

WHO has assessed the risk of a significant public health impact to be very high at the national level, high at the regional level, and low at the global level. ?