• Crisis Severity ?
    2.3
    0 Very low
    Very high 5
  • Impact ?
    1.4
    0 Very low
    Very high 5
  • Humanitarian Conditions ?
    3.0
    0 Very low
    Very high 5
  • Complexity ?
    1.6
    0 Very low
    Very high 5
  • Access Constraints ?
     
    No constraints
    Extreme constraints

Overview

17/03/2022

About 437,000 people (13% of the population analysed) in Tanzania are facing Crisis food insecurity levels (IPC Phase 3) or worse between November 2021 and April 2022. More than 1% of them (22,000 people) face Emergency levels (IPC Phase 4). The most affected districts are Longido and Monduli, where 30% and 25% of the population respectively are food-insecure. Among the drivers of food insecurity in Tanzania are prolonged dry spells, estimated to have started in October 2021, and erratic rainfall during the 2021 rainy season, both of which have led to a below-average harvest and the loss of more than 62,000 livestock.?

As a result of the harvest failure, prices of food such as maize, rice, and beans have increased, reducing the purchasing power of households. In Dar es Salaam, the price of maize (the main staple crop in the country) reached 70,000 Tanzanian shillings per kilo in 2022 compared to 65,000 in 2021. Yet, prices remain lower than the five-year average. Households are resorting to coping strategies such as cutting down on meals, spending a few days without food, or begging for money and food.?

Projections indicate that more people will be food-insecure between May–September 2022. An estimated 592,000 people (17% of the population analysed) will be classified in Crisis food insecurity levels (IPC Phase 3) or worse. The number of people facing Emergency food levels (IPC Phase 4) will also increase to 3% of the analysed population (95,000 people). A below-average rainy season (mid-March to May) and higher temperatures are forecasted and will likely contribute to lower food production and a further increase in prices.?

 

Latest Developments

17/03/2022

No recent significant humanitarian developments. The crisis is being monitored by our analysis team.

KEY PRIORITIES

17/03/2022

Livelihoods: Lack of rain and prolonged dry spells affect people’s agricultural activities, as they mostly depend on rain-fed agriculture and have limited modern farming techniques. The main activity for nearly half of the households living in rural areas is agriculture.?

Food: Below-average harvest has driven people to migrate to other areas looking for food sources. Other households are selling their food stocks to provide for their families. Lack of supplies has resulted in high commodity prices and reduced the purchasing power of families affected by food insecurity.?

WASH: Dry spells have resulted in severe water shortages that affected livestock, especially in Arusha, Kilimanjaro, Manyara, and Tanga regions. In case of water scarcity and poor hygiene practices, the risk of disease outbreaks (such as cholera, considered endemic in Tanzania, or diarrhoea) increases. ?