• Crisis Severity ?
    2.9
    0 Very low
    Very high 5
  • Impact ?
    2.5
    0 Very low
    Very high 5
  • Humanitarian Conditions ?
    2.5
    0 Very low
    Very high 5
  • Complexity ?
    3.8
    0 Very low
    Very high 5
  • Access Constraints ?
    4.0
    No constraints
    Extreme constraints

Overview

05/12/2019

Heavy seasonal rains since at least September 2019 have caused flooding across South Sudan. On 30 October a state of emergency was declared by the Government of South Sudan in 30 counties across eight states: Eastern Equatoria, Central, Jonglei, Lakes, Northern Bahr el Ghazal, Unity, Upper Nile, and Warrap. According to UN OCHA, more than 900,000 people have been affected and at least 600,000 people are in need of immediate humanitarian assistance, including the distribution of food and NFIs, provision of emergency shelter, health care, and WASH infrastructure. ?

In the most impacted areas, health centres, markets, and schools are inaccessible, humanitarian access is restricted, and communities have been displaced to higher ground. Livestock and farmland have also been destroyed, raising concerns of further food insecurity. Delivery of humanitarian aid has begun in many counties, including Maban, where around 200,000 people, including 143,000 refugees have been affected by the floods. The counties hardest hit by the rains are expected to experience acute food shortages and an increased risk of the spread of waterborne diseases.?

Latest Developments

05/12/2019

As of 29 November, more than 908,000 people are determined to be affected by the floods. In Maban county, one of the heaviest affected, schools and health facilities have reopened for both refugee and host communities as of 5 December. However, WASH remains a large concern, particularly for refugees.? Road and infrastructure repairs are a key response activity for organisations, as access to affected communities continues to be a challenge. ?

Key Priorities

05/12/2019

WASH: WASH is a concern in many areas. In Maban, 53% of latrines at schools and health facilities, and 43% of latrines in homes have collapsed, creating poor sanitary conditions, particularly across refugee camps.?

Health:  Access to health facilities and other basic services is hindered in many areas due to damages to key infrastructure such as roads. The damage to WASH facilities and the presence of standing water increases the exposure to certain diseases. ?