• Crisis Severity ?
    3.7
    0 Very low
    Very high 5
  • Impact ?
    2.9
    0 Very low
    Very high 5
  • Humanitarian Conditions ?
    3.6
    0 Very low
    Very high 5
  • Complexity ?
    4.4
    0 Very low
    Very high 5
  • Access Constraints ?
    3.0
    No constraints
    Extreme constraints

Key figures

  • 3,200,000 People affected [?]
  • 169,000 People displaced [?]

Overview

19/01/2022

Somalia is very vulnerable to natural hazards and has experienced 12 droughts since 1990. In April 2021, some areas in the country began experiencing drought conditions ranging from mild to severe after a below-average 2020 Deyr rainy season (October–December). As at December 2021, around 90% of Somalia’s territory was in severe drought conditions after three consecutive below-average rainy seasons. The drought is expected to worsen further with the upcoming Jilaal dry season (January–March). ?

Drought has affected nearly 3.2 million people throughout Somalia and resulted in the displacement of 169,000 people. The Somali population has pre-existing vulnerabilities related to high poverty rates and the compounded effects of long-term conflict and recurrent natural disasters. ?

Latest Developments

19/01/2022

No significant recent humanitarian developments. This crisis is being monitored by our analysis team.

Key Priorities

19/01/2022

Food and livelihoods: The drought has led to poor harvest yields and worsened food insecurity in Somalia. Some livestock has died from lack of pasture and water, disrupting livelihoods for pastoralist communities. Households’ purchasing power in drought-affected communities has declined, as the prices of basic commodities such as cereals, water, and livestock feed have risen in drought-affected areas. ?

WASH: There are severe water shortages throughout Somalia, as water catchments and some boreholes have dried up. Access to safe water and sanitation and hygiene facilities is inadequate, heightening the risk of spread of waterborne diseases such as cholera and acute watery diarrhoea. ?

Health and Nutrition: Limited access to safe water has caused a surge in waterborne diseases, particularly in Galmudug, Hirshabelle, and Puntland states. Throughout Somalia, 1.2 million children under the age of five also need treatment for acute malnutrition.?