• Crisis Severity ?
    2.1
    0 Very low
    Very high 5
  • Impact ?
    2.7
    0 Very low
    Very high 5
  • Humanitarian Conditions ?
    1.5
    0 Very low
    Very high 5
  • Complexity ?
    2.4
    0 Very low
    Very high 5
  • Access Constraints ?
    2.0
    No constraints
    Extreme constraints

Overview

08/08/2022

Above-normal precipitation is expected all over Pakistan during the 2022 monsoon season (July–September). In the first three weeks of the season, the country already received 60% of the total average monsoon rainfall. As at 7 August, heavy rains had affected seven million people across the country and resulted in the flooding of entire villages and farms, flash floods, landslides, and damage to houses, agricultural lands, and infrastructure across the country. As at 2 August, the rains had taken the lives of 478 people, including at least 121 children and 56 women, and injured 536 others. The most affected provinces have been Balochistan, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, and Sindh, with 60% of the affected population located in Balochistan alone. Flooded roads and bridges in the most affected areas are constraining the movement of the population. The Government has set up five camps that can accommodate up to 15,000 displaced people.

Before the flooding, the three provinces already had high levels of food insecurity, malnutrition, and poverty, and 85% of the local population in Balochistan did not have access to clean drinking water. Stagnant floodwater, the lack of safe drinking water, unhygienic water treatment, and defecation practices in Pakistan increase the risk of diseases. The collapse of two dams because of heavy rain has also further increased floods in the province.

Initial assessments showed that 150,000 people, including 30,000 severely affected people, were in need of humanitarian assistance in Balochistan province alone. People in the affected areas required food assistance and emergency relief items, such as tents, tarpaulins, mosquito nets, kitchen items, and jerrycans. Assessments were still being conducted as at 7 August. In Balochistan, an estimated 50% of the 3.1 million affected population in 24 of 35 districts requires assistance.

The monsoon season in Pakistan typically runs from July–September. The monsoon season is associated with the emergence of waterborne diseases. Cases of dengue fever, malaria, diarrhoea, typhoid fever, hepatitis A and E, and gastroenteritis tend to increase during this season. Climate change also worsens the impact of natural disasters in the country, including by shifting the monsoon period to the last week of June instead of the first week of July and causing heavier rainfalls within a much shorter time frame. ?

Latest Developments

08/08/2022

60% of the rainfall for an average monsoon season (July through September) has already arrived in Pakistan. Heavy rains since late June have caused major floods, flash floods, and landslides across the country, including in urban areas, and resulted in a widespread impact on urban infrastructure and agricultural areas. At least 36,000 houses have been damaged and 24,000 livestock lost. Balochistan, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, and Sindh provinces are the most affected, and all three provinces had high preexisting levels of food insecurity, malnutrition, and poverty prior to the monsoon. People in the affected areas need food, health, and WASH assistance, as well as cash and livelihoods support, including animal fodder. 60% of the affected population is in Balochistan, where 150,000 people need humanitarian assistance, including 30,000 people in severe need of aid. Waterborne diseases tend to increase in Pakistan during monsoon season. 85% of the local population in Balochistan did not have access to clean drinking water prior to the monsoon. ?