• Crisis Severity ?
    2.9
    0 Very low
    Very high 5
  • Impact ?
    3.7
    0 Very low
    Very high 5
  • Humanitarian Conditions ?
    2.0
    0 Very low
    Very high 5
  • Complexity ?
    3.4
    0 Very low
    Very high 5
  • Access Constraints ?
    3.0
    No constraints
    Extreme constraints

Overview

22/10/2020

Heavy rainfall since July has caused flooding across Niger. Over 516,000 people have been affected as of 14 September, more than double  the initial prediction of 250,000 in the flood contingency plan. This is the largest seasonal flooding event in the country since 2012 where over 500,000 people were affected. The hardest hit regions are Maradi, Agadez, Tillaberi, Niamey and Tahoua. Needs are reported for food, WASH, non-food items, shelter, and healthcare. Six displacements sites have been impacted by the floods, generating shelter needs for over 9,000 refugees and IDPs.

174,000 people have been affected in Maradi, a region hosting 70,000 registered and unregistered Nigerian refugees. 1,300 refugees in Maradi are in urgent need of shelter, drinking water, food, and NFI assistance.

Over 18,000 cattle were lost, and 15,700 hectares of farmland were flooded as of 14 September. Food security is of particular concern in Tahoua and Tillaberi regions, on the borders with Mali and Burkina Faso, where the local population is already expected to face Crisis (IPC Phase 3) food insecurity through January 2021 as a result of violence and humanitarian access constraints. ?

Latest Developments

22/10/2020

No significant recent humanitarian developments. This crisis is being monitored by our analysis team.

ACAPS' team is daily monitoring the impact of COVID-19. Find more information related to the outbreak here.

Humanitarian Access

22/10/2020

Humanitarian access remains restricted due to the unpredictable security situation, and aggravated by the rainy season, which causes significant flooding across large areas of Niger. Movement is impeded in conflict areas, particularly Tahoua, Tillabery, and Diffa regions, linked to the presence of armed groups. These regions are covered by a state of emergency, last extended in September, that requires use of security escorts by humanitarian organisations. In Diffa and Tillabery, aid workers have been targeted. Spikes in violence have caused the temporary suspensions of humanitarian operations. Further, armed groups are reported to have increasingly used improvised explosive devices, limiting humanitarian access to contaminated areas and the population’s ability to reach aid services.