• Crisis Severity ?
    3.9
    0 Very low
    Very high 5
  • Impact ?
    3.7
    0 Very low
    Very high 5
  • Humanitarian Conditions ?
    4.0
    0 Very low
    Very high 5
  • Complexity ?
    4.0
    0 Very low
    Very high 5
  • Access Constraints ?
    4.0
    No constraints
    Extreme constraints

Key figures

  • 6,544,000 People in Need [?]
  • 1,665,000 IPDs [?]
  • 4,267,000 IPD Returnees [?]

Overview

28/05/2019

Following the defeat of the Islamic State (IS) in Iraq in December 2017, over 4.2 million IDPs have returned to their areas of origin. However, 1.7 million people, including 900,000 children remain internally displaced in Iraq. More than half of the IDPs have been displaced for more than three years. ?Return movements have slowed down as living conditions in areas of origin, especially in the worst conflict-affected governorates, Ninewa, Anbar and Salah Al-Din, are still challenging: buildings and basic infrastructure remain severely damaged; health and educational services are limited; employment opportunities and access land to land are restricted and safety and security is not ensured.?An estimated 11% of returnees face inadequate, undignified and unsafe living conditions.?In many areas previously held by IS, poverty rates exceed 40% and unemployment is as high as 22%. ?

Most IDPs are living in private, out-of-camp settings (70%), including more than 130,000 (8%) living in inadequate shelter arrangements, mostly in Dahuk (34%), Salah al-Din (25%) and Ninewa (15%) governorates. ? The majority of IDPs staying in camps are in Ninewa (52%) and Dahuk (27%). The prolonged nature of displacement has led to increased vulnerabilities among IDPs who face multiple needs, including health, food, and adequate shelter, especially during winter months. Many children in both in- and out-of-camp settings are out of school. ?

Latest Developments

28/05/2019

No recent significant humanitarian developments. The crisis is being monitored by our analysis team.

Key Priorities

28/05/2019

Protection: Vulnerable Iraqis who are associated with or accused of having IS ties are repeatedly denied aid and services by local authorities. A minimum of 45,000 (est.) IDP children in camps, specifically those born under IS rule, are missing civil documentation. This excludes them from attending school, accessing healthcare and other basic services. The process to obtain the documents lasts between 6 months and 2 years due to complex bureaucratic procedures and high corruption rates. ?

Information Gaps and Needs

28/05/2019
  • The tracking of IDPs who became refugees and the number of refugee returnees is lacking. Their needs and their whereabouts remain mostly unknown.