• Crisis Severity ?
    2.1
    0 Very low
    Very high 5
  • Impact ?
    3.6
    0 Very low
    Very high 5
  • Humanitarian Conditions ?
    1.9
    0 Very low
    Very high 5
  • Complexity ?
    1.2
    0 Very low
    Very high 5
  • Access Constraints ?
     
    No constraints
    Extreme constraints

Overview

06/03/2022

Around 121,000 Venezuelan migrants and refugees are hosted in the Dominican Republic at the beginning of 2022. Most have come to the country because of economic collapse in Venezuela. Despite the mobility and migration restrictions imposed because of COVID-19, the flow of Venezuelans to the Dominican Republic has continued in all countries of the Caribbean, including Dominican Republic, sometimes through the use of irregular and unsafe routes. ?

Since April 2021, the country's Migration Normalisation Plan has been in place, which seeks to regularise migrants’ status and allows them to obtain work permits, open bank accounts, and access the social security system. Through the three-stage process - application for extension of stay, visa, and residency - around 100,000 Venezuelan migrants have received a visa. ?

Although the Dominican Republic has one of the fastest growing economies in Latin America and the Caribbean, with a declining poverty rate over the past decade, the population’s access to economic opportunities and services remains unequal. Socioeconomic inequalities, aggravated by the impact of COVID-19, also affect Venezuelan migrants and refugees, who sometimes face limited access to job opportunities and services, especially when lacking documentation. ?

Latest Developments

19/04/2022

No significant recent humanitarian developments. This crisis is being monitored by our analysis team.

KEY PRIORITIES

19/04/2022

Protection: Because of increased migration flows and obstacles to entering the country, many Venezuelan migrants and refugees use irregular crossing points. Irregular transit and difficulties in obtaining asylum seeker status puts them at risk of trafficking, exploitation, abuse, and gender-based violence. ?

Livelihoods: The economic effects of COVID-19 have decreased access to formal work and basic services for Venezuelan migrants and refugees. The lack of regularisation also limits their access to the labour market. Some resort to negative coping mechanisms such as sexual labour. In 2021, 87% of Venezuelan migrants and refugees in the Dominican Republic could not access economic assistance programmes because of their irregular status. ?