Briefing notes

Central African Republic: Conflict and Displacement
Created: 19/05/2017 +

Overview

A spike in fighting over resources occurred in Alindao, Basse-Kotto over 7–9 May, with at least 56 people killed and over 11,000 displaced. In nearby Bangassou, Mbomou prefecture, armed groups killed at least 26 people, with at least 3,000 displaced in CAR, 2,750 fleeing to DRC and 25,000 in need of humanitarian assistance. Government response is lacking and there is no evidence of humanitarian assistance reaching affected populations, excluding emergency healthcare. 

CAR: Cholera Epidemic
Created: 25/08/2016 +

Overview

166 cholera cases and 19 deaths have been recorded in CAR as of 21 August. The government declared an outbreak on 10 August, although cholera was first detected on 27 July in Mourou-Fleuve village, Ndjoukou subprefecture of Kemo, located along the Oubangui River, 100km from the capital Bangui. The outbreak has since spread to Damara subprefecture (Ombella Mpoko) and to at least four arrondissements in Bangui. 

Most of the affected are located along the Oubangui River, which serves as the borer with DRC. Road access to these communities is very limited due to the rainy season. 

Chad: Population Displacement From CAR
Created: 04/04/2016 +

Overview

Civilians have borne the brunt of violence in CAR, prompting large-scale internal and cross-border displacement. Most of CAR’s Muslim population has fled to the eastern part of the country or sought refuge in neighbouring countries. Intercommunal conflict has been ongoing in CAR since December 2013, originating in a cycle of reprisals between the predominantly Muslim and Chad-backed Seleka, and mainly Christian self-defence groups, known as anti-balaka.

From December 2013 to February 2014 the Chadian Government evacuated its citizens from CAR, mainly to camps along the border and to the capital N’Djamena.

Chad officially closed its border with CAR in May 2014, but displaced people have continued to cross into the country.

As of 8 September, there are 113,343 evacuees (including third-country nationals and migrants), and 94,512 CAR refugees, 19,471 of whom have arrived since December 2013.

The newly arrived are mainly Muslim and hosted in predominantly Christian areas in Chad. Before the crisis, CAR refugees in Chad were mostly of non-Muslim background.

The categorisation of displaced people arriving from CAR is a major challenge: most arrive without legal documents.

Chad is host to 461,000 refugees in total. The country faces chronic food insecurity, natural hazards and regular outbreaks of diseases. 

Thematic reports

Crisis Overview 2016: Humanitarian Trends and Risks for 2017
Created: 01/12/2016 +

Overview

The Crisis Overview 2016: Humanitarian Trends and Risks for 2017, outlines the countries where needs are greatest, and growing, as we approach the end of 2016.

Based on our weekly Global Emergency Overview (GEO), and four years of data on humanitarian needs across 150 countries, we have identified ten countries where humanitarian needs are likely to be highest in 2017, as well as four that merit attention, as they face a potential spike in needs. We also consider the humanitarian situation in the northern triangle region of Latin America, where the wide-ranging humanitarian impact of pervasive gang violence is chronically underreported.

Crisis Overview 2015: Humanitarian Trends and Risks for 2016
Created: 22/04/2016 +

Overview

The Crisis Overview 2015: Humanitarian Trends and Risks for 2016, outlines the countries considered to be in greatest humanitarian need as we approach the end of 2015.

Based on our weekly Global Emergency Overview (GEO), and three years of data on humanitarian needs across 150 countries, we have identified eleven countries where humanitarian needs are likely to be highest in 2016, as well as seven that merit attention, as they face a potential spike in needs. A final section considers the potential impact of the current El Niño event across a number of regions.

 

 

Analyse de besoins de crise: Republique Centraficaine. Resume Executif
Created: 22/04/2016 +

Overview

 La RCA connait une situation d’urgence depuis les 5-6 décembre 2013. La crise a débuté en décembre 2012 lorsque la Séléka, une coalition armée menée par des groupes majoritairement musulmans du Nord-Est du pays, a entamé une campagne aboutissant à la prise de la capitale, Bangui, par un coup d’Etat le 24 mars 2013. L’incapacité du nouveau pouvoir à rétablir la sécurité dans le pays ont progressivement fait sombrer la RCA dans le chaos. À l’automne 2013, en réponse aux violences armées perpétrées par d’anciens Séléka contre la population majoritairement chrétienne, des groupes d’auto-défense – les anti-Balaka – se sont formés. Début décembre, suite à une vague de violence sans précédent à Bangui, la crise a pris une nouvelle dimension.  

La crise humanitaire s’est fortement aggravée  au cours des deux mois qui ont suivi les événements des 5-6 décembre 2013. Les violences ont ainsi continué à Bangui où plus de 1 200 personnes ont été tuées et 3 000 blessées à ce jour, avant d’enflammer le reste du pays, frappant en priorité l’Ouest et le Nord-Ouest de la RCA. Les groupes armés ont pris pour cible non seulement les groupes armés adverses, mais aussi des civils de religion opposée. Alors que les tensions entre Chrétiens et Musulmans n’ont cessé d’augmenter, le pays a vu la multiplication des affrontements entre civils sur une base interconfessionnelle.

Sur vote de la résolution 2127 (2013) du Conseil de Sécurité de l’ONU le 5 décembre 2013, un mandat de désarmement des combattants et de protection des civils a été confié conjointement à un contingent français de 1 600 hommes, l’opération « Sangaris », déployé en RCA les 6-7 décembre, et à la Mission Internationale de Soutien à la Centrafrique sous conduite Africaine (MISCA). 

 

Suivi des évaluations de besoins: République centrafricaine
Created: 22/04/2016 +

Overview

Il a pour objectif de renforcer la compréhension qu’ont les acteurs humanitaires de la crise en RCA, au travers des éléments suivants:

  • Une analyse du paysage des évaluations des besoins humanitaires.
  • Une identification des contraintes à ces évaluations.
  • Des pistes de travail permettant de renforcer ces pratiques et de minimiser ces contraintes. 

Ce SdE ne couvre pas l’ensemble des informations disponibles et nécessaires à l’analyse de la crise. Il concerne l’évaluation des besoins humanitaires sur une période donnée, du 1er  décembre 2013 à fin juin 2014. Il n’est donc pas exhaustif des autres évaluations menées préalablement, ni de la littérature produite sur la RCA et sa crise, comme les rapports thématiques ou d’analyse.

Disaster needs analysis: Central African Republic
Created: 22/04/2016 +

Overview

The Central African Republic (CAR) has been in the midst of an escalating emergency since 5-6 December 2013, when fighting between rival armed groups in the capital, Bangui, left at least 1,000 people dead. Fighting, led by a northeastern coalition of armed militia known as Seleka, initially broke out in CAR in December 2012. The Seleka fighters, the majority of whom are Muslim, then seized power in a coup in Bangui on 24 March 2013 and the coalition leader was installed as CAR’s interim President. After disbanding the Seleka in response to international pressure in September, the short-lived President was eventually removed from office in late 2013 while fighting intensified. In response to ongoing attacks by ex-Seleka fighters against the mostly non-Muslim civilian population, ‘self-defence’ militias known as AntiBalaka have mobilised as the crisis took a turn for the worse. 

The humanitarian crisis has worsened significantly in the two months following the violent events on 5-6 December 2013. To date, violence continues to rage in Bangui, where it has so far left 1,200 people dead and 3,000 wounded, and has also spread to other parts of the country, mainly to western and northwestern regions. Various armed groups have targeted not only other combatants, but also civilians based on their Muslim or Christian religion. Against this background, tensions between Christians and Muslims further heightened and inter-civilian fighting, along religious lines, has become widespread. 

Resolution 2127 (2013), voted on by the UN Security Council on 5th December 2013, provided a mandate for a 1,600 strong French military contingent (Operation ‘Sangaris’) to disarm the armed groups and protect civilians. The French troops were deployed to CAR on 6-7 December to work alongside the African-led International Support Mission in the CAR (MISCA) which operates under the same UN mandate.

 

Monitoring needs assessments: Central African Republic
Created: 22/04/2016 +

Overview

This report presents the results of an exercise to collect and analyse the humanitarian needs assessment reports conducted in the Central African Republic (CAR) since December 2013. It aims to reinforce humanitarian actors’ understanding of the CAR crisis by: 

  • analysing the humanitarian needs assessments landscape;
  • identifying the limitations of these assessments; and
  • presenting courses of action to reinforce practices and minimise constraints. 

This monitoring needs assessments (MNA) exercise does not cover all the information available and required for an analysis of the crisis. It focuses on the assessment of humanitarian needs over a set period: 1 December 2013 to end June 2014. It therefore does not include assessments made prior to this period, nor works on the CAR and the crisis in the country such as thematic or analytic reports.

Republique Centrafricaine – Déc. 2013- Juillet 2014
Created: 22/04/2016 +

Overview

La RCA connait une situation d’urgence depuis les 5-6 décembre 2013.

La crise, de dimension régionale, a débuté en décembre 2012 lorsque la Séléka, une coalition armée menée par des groupes majoritairement musulmans du NordEst du pays, a entamé une campagne aboutissant à un coup d’Etat le 24 mars 2013. L’incapacité du nouveau pouvoir à rétablir la sécurité dans le pays ont progressivement fait sombrer la RCA dans le chaos.

 À l’automne 2013, en réponse aux violences armées perpétrées par des éléments Séléka contre la population majoritairement chrétienne, des groupes d’autodéfense – les anti-Balaka – se forment.

En décembre 2013, sur mandat des Nations Unies, la mission interafricaine de maintien de la paix MISCA se déploie ainsi que l’opération française SANGARIS. L’intensification des combats entre ex-Séléka et anti-Balaka et la détérioration complète de la situation aboutissent en janvier 2014 à la démission du président Michel Djotodia et à la nomination d’un gouvernement de transition.

Le 10 avril 2014, le Conseil de Sécurité des Nations Unies vote le déploiement de la mission de maintien de la paix MINUSCA devant remplacer SANGARIS et la MISCA en septembre 2014.