• Crisis Severity ?
    3.5
    0 Very low
    Very high 5
  • Impact ?
    3.6
    0 Very low
    Very high 5
  • Humanitarian Conditions ?
    3.5
    0 Very low
    Very high 5
  • Complexity ?
    3.5
    0 Very low
    Very high 5
  • Access Constraints ?
    3.0
    No constraints
    Extreme constraints

Key figures

  • 463,000 People displaced [?]
  • 1,693,000 People in Need [?]

Overview

02/07/2019

Burundi has been in crisis since April 2015 after President Nkurunziza’s announcement to run for a third term. The economy has declined significantly due to political instability and insecurity and with the suspension of foreign aid, which was 48% of the national income in 2015. ?Despite a decrease in overt violence since 2016, violations such as disappearances and torture by the police, military, and the ruling party’s youth league, Imbonerakure, persist. ?

The economic crisis, widespread poverty, and climatic factors are the main drivers of food insecurity. ?Although the number of people facing food insecurity has declined in 2018, 1.67 million people are still estimated to face crisis and emergency levels, exacerbated by population density and movement? The main trigger of internal displacement are climatic hazards such as dry spells or floods, therefore IDP figures vary across seasons. 65% of the Burundian population live below the poverty line and it is the country most affected by chronic malnutrition worldwide. ?

Latest Developments

09/09/2019

No recent significant humanitarian developments. The crisis is being monitored by our analysis team.

Humanitarian Access

23/05/2019

High constraints

Criminality and insecurity resulting from the socioeconomic situation continue to restrict humanitarian access. Humanitarian activities and movements are heavily regulated by the Burundian government: local and international organisations face administrative restrictions, bans, suspensions, and even staff arrests. Heavy rains and floods routinely cause damage to infrastructure, particularly roads and bridges, decreasing access to affected populations. The political context makes it difficult for agencies to share information about the crisis.

Download the full Humanitarian Access Overview

Key Priorities

23/05/2019

Health: A lack of health centres in 50% of administrative departments as well as a lack of health workers and medical supplies is one of the major barriers to the provision of adequate healthcare, rendering the country extremely vulnerable to epidemics and other shocks. ?

Protection: The violent repression mainly targets opponents of the government and/or the ruling party (CNDD-FDD) or people perceived as such but also Burundians trying to flee the country, journalists, and members of civil society organisations. ? 

Access to basic services: A growing proportion of the population is deprived of access to education, nutrition, healthcare, and WASH as financial pressure from authorities and the ruling party (CNDD-FDD) is increasing with additional taxes and involuntary contributions for the 2020 elections, exacerbating poverty.?