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Country analysis

Russia


After the onset of the Russia-Ukraine conflict in 2014, in February 2022, Russia launched a full-scale invasion from Russian and Belarusian territory into northern, eastern, and southern Ukraine. This has resulted in mass displacement within Ukraine and abroad, mostly to the EU.

As at early 2024, more than 1.2 million Ukrainians remained displaced in Russia. Despite the large number of people affected, information on needs remains extremely limited and difficult to verify. Individuals who have left Russia and returned to Ukraine serve as the primary sources of information. Their experiences suggest that priority needs include cash assistance and documentation, particularly for those forcibly displaced to the far east of Russia who cannot afford to leave, putting them at risk of labour exploitation if displacement is protracted. Ukrainians forcefully displaced into Russia may also require urgent protection and medical assistance, particularly if unlawfully detained.

6,000 children brought to Russia from Ukrainian territory without their parents or legal guardians have been identified, but the actual number is likely much higher.

(CFR accessed 23/11/2023, UNHCR accessed 29/01/2024, HRW 01/09/2022, AP 13/07/2023, Conflict Observatory 14/02/2023)

After the onset of the Russia-Ukraine conflict in 2014, in February 2022, Russia launched a full-scale invasion from Russian and Belarusian territory into northern, eastern, and southern Ukraine. This has resulted in mass displacement within Ukraine and abroad, mostly to the EU.

As at early 2024, more than 1.2 million Ukrainians remained displaced in Russia. Despite the large number of people affected, information on needs remains extremely limited and difficult to verify. Individuals who have left Russia and returned to Ukraine serve as the primary sources of information. Their experiences suggest that priority needs include cash assistance and documentation, particularly for those forcibly displaced to the far east of Russia who cannot afford to leave, putting them at risk of labour exploitation if displacement is protracted. Ukrainians forcefully displaced into Russia may also require urgent protection and medical assistance, particularly if unlawfully detained.

6,000 children brought to Russia from Ukrainian territory without their parents or legal guardians have been identified, but the actual number is likely much higher.

(CFR accessed 23/11/2023, UNHCR accessed 29/01/2024, HRW 01/09/2022, AP 13/07/2023, Conflict Observatory 14/02/2023)

Latest updates on country situation

05 December 2023

In November 2023, the Russian authorities arrested a volunteer assisting refugees from Ukraine in the bordering Belgorod oblast in Russia. Volunteer groups fill an important gap, providing critical assistance for populations not covered by the Russian State or registered humanitarian organisations. These populations include the displaced people transiting through Russia after their refusal of the Russian passport deprived them of access to essential services in Russian-controlled areas in Ukraine. ([Current Time 20/11/2023(https://www.currenttime.tv/a/demidenko-delo-o-gosizmene/32692114.html), 7x7 10/10/2023, BBC 12/10/2023)

15 November 2023

Ukrainian prisoners of war may still be facing forceful conscription in Russia in 2023. Since 2014, as many as 40,000 people may have been forcefully conscripted. Ukrainian prisoners of war and civilian detainees face severe protection risks, including the widespread use of torture, while humanitarian access to them remains constrained. (CNN 10/11/2023, IWPR 06/06/2023, T4P 15/09/2023)

current crises
in Russia

RUS002 - Displacement from Russia-Ukraine conflict

Last updated 30/01/2024


Drivers

Conflict
Displacement

Crisis level

Country

Severity level

2.7 Medium

Access constraints

3.0